New Book on Evolving Legal Status of Pets

Animal Blawg

Final Cover (sans quote) Hi All,

Please excuse the self-promotion, but today marks the publication of my first book, Citizen Canine: Our Evolving Relationship with Cats and Dogs. The book is about how pets have become more like family, not only in our homes, but also in the eyes of the law. It covers a number of topics that would be of interest to the Animal Blawg community, including:

–The evolving legal status of cats and dogs in courtrooms and legislatures

–The rise of the animal law and animal protection movements

–The backlash against animal rights from the veterinary, scientific, and agriculture communities

Reviews have begun coming in, and they’ve been great so far:

“Well researched and also very personable, this book will make readers think as they look into the eyes of those furry beings that share their lives.” Booklist

“This engrossing, enjoyable, and well-researched title contributes positively to the literature on companion animals…

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About naturestage

Miranda Loud is the Founder and Artistic Director of the non-profit NatureStage based in Waltham, MA, and is an interdisciplinary artist - classical singer/organist/filmmaker/photographer and environmentalist. She writes about the vital need for education to include a more heart-centered approach to studying other species that leads to a sense of stewardship. Naturestage creates works that foster empathy and kinship with other species, using the emotional power of storytelling in different art forms, mainly film, photography and music. She is also a public speaker on art and social change. Her current projects include The One Language Project, Park Dreams, The Elephant Project, and Elephantasia which all use different art forms to encourage a mind shift in how we relate to other species by asking "How would the world be different if we viewed other species as someones instead of somethings? If, instead of drawing lines, we drew circles?"
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